THE LATEST

 

The time has come for me to bring this project to a close. My creativity is beckoning me to other places and projects, and in order to make way for this burgeoning energy, I have decided to move on. 

First, I want to express deep gratitude to everyone who has opened up to me and shared space with me in person and in communication on facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, Twitter, and via email. Your stories, your energy, your support, and your feedback have given me so much and I am truly grateful for the time and interest you have given. 

Humans of Portland has represented such an amazing chapter of my life. It has fostered who I have become as a communicator, a photographer, and a compassionate human being. I have learned a great deal from hearing about individual journeys that are so different than my own, and enjoyed sharing in the places where we overlap. This project has opened creative and professional doors for me, given me huge opportunities for spiritual growth, and through it I have met some incredible people who have become dear friends. 

I am currently in various stages of new projects that I’m excited to share as they become ready. If you are interested in my photographic journey as I move forward, I welcome you to find me here: (Briana Cerezo Photographyhttps://www.facebook.com/BrianaCerezoPhotography) and on Instagram (@brianacerezo). My website www.brianacerezo.com is undergoing a complete overhaul and I’m excited to share it soon.  In closing, I’m posting many Humans of Portland portraits that have until now, have not been posted, for various reasons. (To see all the newly posted photos, some with quotes, please visit the facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/HumansofPDX) 

Be well, and please remember to practice loving compassion for yourself and those around you. We all have so many stories to tell, and reasons for the places we are at on our journey. We are all human. 

Love, 

Briana Cerezo

I’m going to tell you something. Sometimes photography isn’t really about the photos at all. It isn’t about making things look beautiful or preserving memories. This is certainly one approach. But for me, sometimes taking photos is simply about curiosity about what will happen during an interaction between myself, a camera, and a subject. It’s an experiment. 

I was thinking about this while I was at a party last weekend. I hadn’t brought my “real” camera with me, and for a brief moment felt disappointed, because I felt like without a “legitimate” camera, I couldn’t approach people for photos the way I normally would. But then I decided that was a pretty limiting way of thinking, and decided to move beyond that restrictive approach. 

I decided to see what would happen if I took pictures with my cell phone only that night, and especially what would happen if I approached strangers and right off the bat asked if they’d take a selfie with me. 

First, I hadn’t met any of the people in these photos before taking these photos with them. Not a single person I approached said no to taking a selfie with me. Only one person asked “Why?” and asked what I was going to do with it. 

As the night went on, a couple of people expressed disappointment when they found out I was asking just about everybody to take a photo with me. “I thought I was special,” one person said.

At least one person took the invitation for a photo as me as some sort of flirtatious advance (it wasn’t). 

By the end of the night, I had earned the endearing nickname “selfie girl.” 

(I’m also going to say in advance, that I no longer care if in this mode of experimenting with format and content on Humans of Portland, I lose followers. It’s bound to happen, and that’s fine. My creative freedom comes first, and if you want to be along for the ride, I’d love to have you! Cheers!)

 (More Selfies With Strangers photos on the Facebook page: